The Birth of God in Historical Context

Dear Readers, I mentioned earlier this year that I hoped to publish this book by year’s end. The book is a compilation of my earlier work in history as an undergraduate student, posts and debates that had been published on this blog and material written from my most recent Master’s class in theology on the Synoptic Gospels. The book looks for a historical foundation within … Continue reading The Birth of God in Historical Context

Farewell to the Devil?

In his essay “Farewell to the Devil?”, Joseph Ratzinger (Pope Benedict XVI) examines and rebuts the argument presented by Swiss Catholic Theologian Herbert Haag, who asserts that Satan does not exist and that Satan was an idea that manifested ancient Jewish culture’s understanding of evil and sin. (Ratzinger, Farewell to the Devil? 197.) Haag’s thesis was written during the time of great cultural upheaval both … Continue reading Farewell to the Devil?

Biblical Exegesis: Primarily a philosophical discussion or historical?

Pope Benedict XVI explained in his 1988 Erasmus lectures, “The debate about modern exegesis is not at its core a debate among historians, but among philosophers”. (Matthew J. Ramage, Jesus Interpreted, 9). Is the discussion of the Holy Scriptures primarily a philosophical debate of those who claim there is a God and those who do not? The statement appears to be correct on the surface; … Continue reading Biblical Exegesis: Primarily a philosophical discussion or historical?

Do Miracles need a priori knowledge?

Objection: The affirmation of the Resurrection as a miracle is connected to the event itself, a position that rejects, a priori of the miraculous would leave no room for the Resurrection as the Gospels teach it.” First off, I’d simply point to the picture and ask, “If you had no idea of the miraculous, wouldn’t you have some understanding seeing this event transpire?” Therefore, No … Continue reading Do Miracles need a priori knowledge?