The Birth of God in Historical Context

Dear Readers, I mentioned earlier this year that I hoped to publish this book by year’s end. The book is a compilation of my earlier work in history as an undergraduate student, posts and debates that had been published on this blog and material written from my most recent Master’s class in theology on the Synoptic Gospels. The book looks for a historical foundation within … Continue reading The Birth of God in Historical Context

Biblical Exegesis: Primarily a philosophical discussion or historical?

Pope Benedict XVI explained in his 1988 Erasmus lectures, “The debate about modern exegesis is not at its core a debate among historians, but among philosophers”. (Matthew J. Ramage, Jesus Interpreted, 9). Is the discussion of the Holy Scriptures primarily a philosophical debate of those who claim there is a God and those who do not? The statement appears to be correct on the surface; … Continue reading Biblical Exegesis: Primarily a philosophical discussion or historical?

The Ark of History: St. Augustine’s City of God

via wikipedia commons: “The Arka Church” in Nowa Huta, Poland. St. Augustine’s City of God is such a vast body of work that to write several thousand words on the document would be futile. Instead of writing a quasi-commentary on the text, the hope here to highlight the theme of salvation historiography that Augustine attempts to flesh out from the fall of the Roman empire. … Continue reading The Ark of History: St. Augustine’s City of God

St. Augustine: On Christian Doctrine Commentary–Full Text

In his book The Theology of Augustine, Matthew Levering focuses on the theme of love, what is love and how it functions in Christian teaching. As Levering examines, according to Augustine, Scripture teaches how to love. It must be vital for the interpreter of scripture to recognize how the words of scripture direct us to love of God. So what does it mean to love? … Continue reading St. Augustine: On Christian Doctrine Commentary–Full Text

On the Influence of St. Augustine

St. Augustine is the most quoted Saint in the Catechism of the Catholic Church with 87 Citations followed by St. Thomas Aquinas at 61. Naturally, in many respects, as asserted by Bishop Robert Barron asserts in his Pivotal Players series, St. Augustine is “one of three or four most important players in the history of the Church…he is a pivotal figure in the development of … Continue reading On the Influence of St. Augustine

On Prayer

 photo via Wikipedia Our prayer life must be one undertaken through the instruction of the Holy Spirit and also by ordering our will toward God. The Catechism reads, “Through living transmission (Sacred Tradition) within “the believing and praying Church,” the Holy Spirit teaches the children of God how to pray.”(CCC 2650) If we’re moved to learn how to pray through the traditions of the Church, the … Continue reading On Prayer

St. John Chrysostom

St. John Chrysostom was born around 349 A.D. in Antioch and like many of the other Church Fathers we’ve discussed like St. Justin Martyr and St. Athanasius was born into wealth. The affluence of his family allowed him to taught by one of antiquities greatest teachers, Libanius. The famous pagan professor said “It is a pity…that the boy is a Christian—otherwise he could be my … Continue reading St. John Chrysostom